Featured Poet: Sharon Robinson

Today was Arbor Day, so I thought I’d share this gem from Sharon Lia Robinson.

 

***

 

Skagit Valley Forest

 

tonight
light and silent
the tree seemed to say
come close

the tree saying be,
be together in your soul
your center yourself

newly planted and old
the trees sing and say
we see you
feel yourself
know you

we are here too
in the breath of our earth
we hear you
we know you too, your reaching
we know you too, your reaching.

 

***

 

Sharon Lia Robinson is a visual artist, documentary film producer, poet and writer. Her creative mission reflects the desire to inspire others through her artistic vision. Early life challenges and the desire for tikkun olam (healing and restoration in the world) are also reflected in her creative projects. More of Sharon’s art, poetry and films may be seen at www.sharonrobinson.org.

 

 

Advertisements

Featured Poet: Emily Dickinson

This isn’t technically a Women Writers Wednesday review, but I have to give a shout-out today, on a Wednesday, on Earth Day, to Emily Dickinson. She has been known to many as one of the greatest American poets, or as “The Belle of Amherst,” or as “that crazy lady in the white dress locked in her house all her life.” (True story, I knew someone who referred to her like that, not out of abject disrespect so much as out of frustrated curiosity.)

No matter what you call her, she was and remains a force majeure of American letters. The more I read of her work throughout my life, the better I can appreciate the depth of her intellectual and poetic gifts.

Today I came across one of her poems I had not seen before. Since it’s Earth Day, I wanted to feature a poem about nature, and this seemed like a good one to include. It’s number as 668 in the source I encountered (PoemHunter.com).

 

***

668

 

“Nature” is what we see—
The Hill—the Afternoon—
Squirrel—Eclipse— the Bumble bee—
Nay—Nature is Heaven—
Nature is what we hear—
The Bobolink—the Sea—
Thunder—the Cricket—
Nay—Nature is Harmony—
Nature is what we know—
Yet have no art to say—
So impotent Our Wisdom is
To her Simplicity.

 

***

 

What can I tell you about Emily Dickinson that you don’t probably already know? How about this: one of my favorite National Poetry Month posters ever is from 2005 — incidentally, the month my daughter was born — and was designed by Chip Kidd. It features Emily Dickinson’s dress on a black background and a marvelous quote from her letters. “Nature is a haunted house — but Art — is a house that tries to be haunted.”

 

Emily Dickinson NPM 2005