Feeds:
Posts
Comments

Every year in October, poetry is celebrated in style at the weekend-long Houston Poetry Fest. Next weekend is this year’s festival.

I’m pleased to announce that my poem “At the El Felix” is being published in their anthology this year. I’ll also be reading some of my poetry at the opening night soirée. Here are the details in case you’re in town and want to join us:

Friday, October 10, 2014
7:30 pm.
Willow Street Pump Station (downtown)
811 North San Jacinto Street

For more information about the festival and to see lists of the other readers over the weekend, please click the HPFest link here.

I hope to see you there!

Early Autumn Haiku

Dead rosehips caught on

a spider’s silk — lo! nature’s

dark dangly earring.

This beautiful, brief, and important post was written by the mother of one of my students, and even though it’s not September anymore, I hope we can all take a moment to consider, while we are rightfully and appropriately “saving the ta-tas” this month, that a really important part of cancer research is woefully underfunded. Please share widely if you are so inclined.

 

http://www.texaschildrensblog.org/2014/09/national-childhood-cancer-awareness-month-a-mothers-perspective/

Just  2 1/2 hours left till I give away three free copies of Finis.! Click here to Like the post announcing the giveaway on the book’s Facebook page before then to be entered. Details are in the post.

And then I’ll be announcing the winners across my social media later tonight! Stay tuned…

angeliquejamail:

Some excellent common-sense commentary from Russ Linton, author of Crimson Son.

Originally posted on Russ Linton:

Opposite-of-white-BeetleSeveral weeks ago, I backed a Kickstarter for Kill the Freshman, an awesome looking graphic novel written and headed up by my friend, Alex Langley. (You may know him from his successful and ultra geeky, Geek Handbook or the follow-up Geek Lust.) As a reward, his brother and project artist, Nick Langley sketched a hella-cool White Beetle, Black beetle’s own bizarro world mirror character.

They sent it scanned upside-down because they’re badass like that.

One reason I wanted to mention this worthy project is because of the recent flap about an alternate Spider Woman cover. I realize this has faded a bit from the news, but in case you missed the debate you can read up here.

Essentially, an alternate cover for Spider Woman came out that was more porn star than superhero.

Of course, anyone who buys comics is probably scratching their head and wondering “what’s new”?

Comics have…

View original 467 more words

I wanted to do a Goodreads Giveaway of Finis. to celebrate the first week of autumn, but they require giveaways to be printed books, and Finis. is an ebook only at this time. So instead, I’m hosting my own giveaway on Facebook! Head on over to my Finis. page on FB for more details — and while you’re there, how about giving the page a Like?

Thank you to everyone for their support. I especially appreciate the reviews of Finis. and the feedback I’ve been getting from readers all over the social media landscape. Keep it coming, and please do spread the word!

It’s that time of year again: Banned Books Week! The week where we conspicuously celebrate the fact that we, as adults*, are allowed to read what we want to and that no one else has the right to tell us otherwise or foist their hang-ups on us.

 

RB burning book poster

Censorship causes blindness.

 

So in honor of Banned Books Week, I offer my students extra credit during the whole month of September to read a book from the official Banned Books list, one they’ve never read before, and then to write a short review explaining why they think the book was banned and whether they agree with that. (A few notes for those who might want to share this assignment: I tell them they must not, on their honor, look up why the book was banned, since that would defeat the purpose of the assignment, which is all about THINKING FOR THEMSELVES; whether they agree with the ban is completely irrelevant to their score on the assignment or whether they get the extra credit, because as long as they present a cogent argument, I don’t have to agree with it to give it high marks.)

So I’m curious: what’s your take on banned books? Have you read any banned books? What did you think about it/them?

Chuck Wendig’s blog today asks about books you love but others hate and books you hate but others love. This is really interesting to me, too. Please share your thoughts in the comments below.

 

***

* Note the “as adults” part. As a parent, I still monitor what my young children are allowed to read, as best I can. I don’t sanitize things for them, but I do strongly caution them against books which I know have too-heavy subject matter and help them gently through the consequences if they go against my recommendation. And this also has limitations. For example, I counseled my daughter when she was eight through her existential crisis over the death of Sirius Black, but there’s no way in heaven or hell I’m going to let her read anything by Kresley Cole till she’s at least eighteen — or maybe twenty-one!  ;)

Follow

Get every new post delivered to your Inbox.

Join 372 other followers